To respond to the query, why art is important in our lives, I say that it is encoded in our DNA. As babies we use any medium handy (toothpaste?) to smear on any available surface (newly painted walls in the hallway) and then we come back to it after we have raised our family and have more “me time”. So revel in your creative work and take heart that maybe one day in the far away future someone will find a piece of yours and put it in a museum – with the signature of unknown artist!

Art Dealers. Are you thinking about being one??

I was reading a blog by a very skilled traditionalist or figurative painter, how many names can we give something? She posits a question to her readers asking what people reading her blog think of gallery directors asking an artist to make changes to their work, for reasons such as my customers like blue paintings this year. Or my customers are very interested in cloud paintings. All the responses were inarticulate, I mean seriously bad grammar. (This is another one of my pet peeve subjects, I am a terrible speller and my grammar is colloquial at best, so I make a strong effort to be correct.) After which I read through them all and it hurt. I tried to understand what the point of this question was? It reminded me of a woman I knew who was able to deflect the fact that she had no idea what to say to people by deftly saying ”Tell me more, tell me more”!

Just as anyone who has to fill airspace or newspaper space or Internet space 24/7 this blogger asked a mundane and innocuous question. And true to speculation, there were plenty, albeit poorly written, responses.

So I posit, do you think you want to be an art dealer? NOT a gallery owner or director, that is another sub species, but an art dealer. The art dealer sells his expertise on art to clients and acts as a buffer, an expert, a firewall against the moronic people out in the art world who don’t know anything, really. An art critic with a salesman sensibility is really what the job entails.

As an artist who has worked in many genres, and been represented by many galleries and have had and still get commissions from so many different people and companies I can say something to this bloggers question that rings true for all artists, the point of view from someone who can make you money telling you what they think you should paint is a good thing because it means they will make you money!!!! They will work hard to sell what you do. And BECAUSE they have had a say, a part in the final piece, they are more invested. REALLY this is selling 101!!!

I ran a mural business in LA for thirteen years. I had people looking over my shoulder for every one of those years telling me what they think!!! Albeit Mural Mural On The Wall was a commercial business it was still my artwork on the wall and I struggled to maintain some control! But I understood from my many years in the big leagues of advertising you do what the customer wants, period. But if you want to have complete control, complete say over your work product then don’t put it out for review or critique!

I had a client who will remain unnamed for obvious reasons (she was a very famous TV actress).

She wanted certain murals, faux finishes and painted furniture throughout her home in Westwood, California and I did exactly what she wanted and was well paid. I received great referrals and was on two TV shows because of the work I did for her. The work was as good as anything I painted as a fine artist because she, like most of my mural clients had strong opinions but the painting was executed by me. To my standards, to allow me to get more work and more press.

Michelangelo painted what Pope Julius II told him toImage , sculpted what Lorenzo De Medici Imagetold him to and look where that got him!!Image Someone please give me work and tell me what to do!!

Art Dealers. Ar…

Art Dealers. Are you thinking about being one??

I was reading a blog by a very skilled traditionalist or figurative painter, how many names can we give something? She posits a question to her readers asking what people reading her blog think of gallery directors asking an artist to make changes to their work, for reasons such as my customers like blue paintings this year. Or my customers are very interested in cloud paintings. All the responses were inarticulate, I mean seriously bad grammar. (This is another one of my pet peeve subject, I am a terrible speller and my grammar is colloquial at best, so I make a strong effort to be correct.) Which after I read through them all it hurt. I tried to understand what the point of this question was? It reminded me of a woman I knew who was able to deflect the fact that she had no idea what to say to people by deftly saying ”Tell me more, tell me more”!

Just as anyone who has to fill airspace or newspaper space or Internet space 24/7 this blogger asked a mundane and innocuous question. And true to speculation, there were plenty, albeit poorly written, responses.

So I posit, do you think you want to be an art dealer? NOT a gallery owner or director, that is another sub species, but an art dealer. The art dealer sells his expertise on art to clients and acts as a buffer, an expert, a firewall against the moronic people out in the art world who don’t know anything, really. An art critic with a salesman sensibility is really what the job entails.

As a an artist who has worked in many genres, and been represented by many galleries and have had and still get commissions from so many different people and companies I can say something to this bloggers question that rings true for all artists, the point of view from someone who can make you money telling you what they think you should paint is a good thing because it means they will make you money!!!! They will work hard to sell what you do. And BECAUSE they have had a say, a part in the final piece, they are more invested. REALLY this is selling 101!!!

I ran a mural business in LA for thirteen years. I had people looking over my shoulder for every one of those years telling me what they think!!! Albeit Mural Mural On The Wall was a commercial business it was still my artwork on the wall and I struggled to maintain some control! But I understood from my many years in the big leagues of advertising you do what the customer wants, period. But if you want to have complete control, complete say over your work product then don’t put it out for review or critique!

I had a client who will remain unnamed for obvious reasons (she was a very famous TV actress).

She wanted certain murals, faux finishes and painted furniture throughout her home in Westwood, California and I did exactly what she wanted and was well paid. I received great referrals and was on two TV shows because of the work I did for her. The work was as good as anything I painted as a fine artist because she, like most of my mural clients had strong opinions but the painting was executed by me. To my standards, to allow me to get more work and more press.

Michaelangelo painted what Pope Julius II told him toImage , sculpted what Lorenzo De Medici Imagetold him to and look where that got him!!Image Someone please give me work and tell me what to do!!

What The Hell, How Much??

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In the 90’s art became obscene or the art market became outrageous and ironically linked to the sales of real estate. Of course one could say I have a brand new 41,000 square foot monster on Fire Island and I need a giant magenta Jeff Koons Poodle.  IN MY F&*%**^ living room!

Galleries became bigger, became associated with big names – excuse me not the artists, the art dealers, Gagosian, ( add more). Multinational!! The more big name galleries the more product, a “Star Making Machinery”. Thanks Joanie! More new wealth needed green paintings, blue paintings, red paintings, LOUD, LOUD art, full of no concept or idea other than “Look at my painting! Painting, it was a mess and BIG!!!

I was approached by a artist here in LA who got me to paint for a dealer in Miami where like he, I would paint master copies (Dufe, Modigliani) for his clientele (Asian primarily) I sold two and then quit that crap. Money was okay, but come on I HAVE INTEGRITY, the lament of a creative, right??? A lot of people struck it rich and laughed their way to the bank, not my bank, true!

A lot of good art was made, but even more crap was pushed through the sucking orifice of the art dealer. The anal passage called the gallery. Then the collapse of 2008! But not the art market, no. It kept growing. According to art critic Jerry Saltz, art critic for the New York Magazine and his recent article “MAGIC AMID THE MONEY”.

But like all systems, contraction comes about, the universe doesn’t like a vacuum and so forth and art started to show up from small private places. The machinery had spewed out so much “factory” like stuff that this balance had to occur. IT ALWAYS DOES!!

Guess what happened true artists started finding their voice again and as if being awakened from a candy nightmare artwork started showing up that was personal and “private” “Out There” yet exhilarating, again!

But the relationship between artist and art lover will be defiled by a dealer soon enough. Because people with money demand a firewall, a barrier between them and the effrontery of direct artist collector experience. I fear they fear their inability to understand, empathize, sympathize and they need this arbiter of tastelessness. The Art Dealer!!

Is anyone listening? Art dealers are stealing your right to love art!

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“Be quiet: I can’t hear myself see.Jerry Saltz Art Critic New York magazine.

I hate art auctions. Not just because they’re freak-show legal casinos, spectacles where the Über-ultrarich can act out as profligately in public as possible, trying to buy immortality, become a part of art history, make headlines, and create profit. I don’t only hate them because they may be the whitest sector in the entire world. I hate them for what they do to art, for the bad magic of making mysterious powerful things turn into numbers.Last night, after being touted in the lamestream media as potentially the “most expensive painting ever,” Edward Munch’s 1895 pastel The Scream came up on the auction block. The whole event amounted to about ten minutes of back-and-forth banter, during which the theatrical Sotheby’s auctioneer Tobias Meyer tempted the fates by cooing, “I’ve got all the time in the world.” (I had such a vision of Wotan sweeping him up and whisking him off to the underworld right there!) With dapper white men and tall, thin white women making little finger signals while holding phones, speaking to strangers in Dubai or Russia or Beijing or Mitt Romney’s garage, the painting was sold “to an unknown telephone bidder” for $119.5 million. Thus, a great work of art that had been all but lost to us, hanging in a private Norwegian home for more than a century, made a brief public appearance and then was sold off to another private owner, probably to disappear for another 100 years. We will likely never see this work of art again in our lifetimes. The Scream is a part of art history and should hang in a public collection, probably in Norway, and not just decorate a California den or a dacha in the Ukraine, waiting to be fodder for the next auction. (Needless to say, no museum was in a position to spend that kind of money.

I just found this art critic on the web ( New York Magazine) and I hope he allows me to copy some of his observations, because in his quips are realities of how our society robs our artists of their guts! Should we the public judge artists as if they have a responsibility to us in their work? Or do we have a responsibility to love them and allow them to work?? Does this bring in the charlatan the poseur the mean spirited member of society who can now get permission to abuse???

Art Dealers and have they usurped our freedom to choose?

ImageArnold “Arne” Glimcher (born March 12, 1938) is an American art dealer, film producer and director. He is the founder of The Pace Gallery and is widely known as one of the art world’s most powerful dealers. Glimcher has also produced and directed several films, including The Mambo Kings and Just Cause.
Glimcher was born in Duluth, Minnesota. He graduated from Massachusetts College of Art and Design and Boston University. In 1960, Glimcher founded the Pace Gallery in Boston. In 1963, Glimcher moved the gallery to New York City. Today there are four gallery locations in New York and an additional gallery in Beijing. The Pace Gallery represents contemporary artists including Chuck Close, Tara Donovan, David Hockney, Maya Lin and Kiki Smith. It also represents the estates of several artists, including Pablo Picasso, Agnes Martin, Ad Reinhardt, and Alexander Calder. Today, Glimcher, serves as Chairman of the Pace Gallery. During his career he has worked closely with important artists, including Jean Dubuffet, Robert Rauschenberg, Louise Nevelson, and Lucas Samaras. In 2007, Glimcher received the Distinguished Alumni Award from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

FORMAL ANALYSIS

-Four levels of formal analysis, which you can use to explain a work of art:

1. Description = pure description of the object without value judgments,

analysis, or interpretation.

· It answers the question, “What do you see?”

· The various elements that constitute a description include:

a. Form of art whether architecture, sculpture, painting or one of the minor arts

b. Medium of work whether clay, stone, steel, paint, etc., and technique (tools used)

c. Size and scale of work (relationship to person and/or frame and/or context)

d. Elements or general shapes (architectural structural system) within the composition, including building of post-lintel construction or painting with several figures lined up in a row; identification of objects

e. Description of axis whether vertical, diagonal, horizontal, etc.

f. Description of line, including contour as soft, planar, jagged, etc.

g. Description of how line describes shape and space (volume); distinguish between lines of objects and lines of composition, e.g., thick, thin, variable, irregular, intermittent, indistinct, etc.

h. Relationships between shapes, e.g., large and small, overlapping, etc.

i. Description of color and color scheme = palette

j. Texture of surface or other comments about execution of work

k. Context of object: original location and date

2. Analysis = determining what the features suggest and deciding why the artist used such features to convey specific ideas.

· It answers the question, “How did the artist do it?”

· The various elements that constitute analysis include:

a. Determination of subject matter through naming iconographic elements, e.g., historical event, allegory, mythology, etc.

b. Selection of most distinctive features or characteristics whether line, shape, color, texture, etc.

c. Analysis of the principles of design or composition, e.g., stable,

repetitious, rhythmic, unified, symmetrical, harmonious, geometric, varied, chaotic, horizontal or vertically oriented, etc.

d. Discussion of how elements or structural system contribute to appearance of image or function

e. Analysis of use of light and role of color, e.g., contrasty, shadowy,

illogical, warm, cool, symbolic, etc.

f. Treatment of space and landscape, both real and illusionary (including use of perspective), e.g., compact, deep, shallow, naturalistic, random

g. Portrayal of movement and how it is achieved

h. Effect of particular medium(s) used

i. Your perceptions of balance, proportion and scale (relationships of each part of the composition to the whole and to each other part) and your emotional

j. Reaction to object or monument

3. Interpretation = establishing the broader context for this type of art.

· It answers the question, “Why did the artist create it and what does it mean

· The various elements that constitute interpretation include:

a. Main idea, overall meaning of the work.

b. Interpretive Statement: Can I express what I think the artwork is about in one sentence?

c. Evidence: What evidence inside or outside the artwork supports my interpretation?

4. Judgment: Judging a piece of work means giving it rank in relation to other works and of course considering a very important aspect of the visual arts; its originality.

· Is it a good artwork?

· Criteria: What criteria do I think are most appropriate for judging the artwork?

· Evidence: What evidence inside or outside the artwork relates to each criterion?

· Judgment: Based on the criteria and evidence, what is my judgment about the quality of the artwork?